Foster FAQ

RUFF HOUSE ANIMAL RESCUE

Fostering saves lives and gives animals a second chance at life and love. 


Ruff House Animal Rescue would love to have YOU as a foster family! 


Foster homes are the backbone of any animal rescue; the more people willing to open their hearts and homes to helping animals in-need, the more animals we can bring into the rescue program. Not only do we appreciate our foster families, we depend on them. 


Fostering doesn't cost you anything but an open heart and open home; all expenses are covered by RHAR and any supplies you may need are provided for you. 


WHAT DO FOSTERS DO?

Foster homes are the backbone of our rescue; without fosters willing to open their hearts and homes to animals in-need, we would not be able to save any dogs needing a second chance!  A foster is a temporary placement for our animals. The foster home, foster parents, will be responsible for basic housetraining, socialization, health care, and temperament assessment of a placed pet. The foster family is the 'advocate' for the pet for potential adopters.  We rely on our foster homes to assess the personality of the pet, identify any behavioral issues that need to be worked on, etc. Therefore, we like the dogs to be walked (how are they on the leash?), socialized with other pets and people, etc. Some dogs may need to be housebroken or crate-trained (they are more adoptable).  The more information the foster home can provide us, the more likely the ultimate placement of the pet is successful. Fostering is a very fulfilling way to help out.  If you've thought about adopting a pet, but aren't quite sure what breed is best for you, fostering is a wonderful way to try out different types of animals and determine whether they are suitable for your lifestyle.  The more foster homes we have - the more pets we can help!

WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENTS TO BE A FOSTER HOME?

▪ Be 18 years of age or older.
▪ Have valid identification showing your current address.
▪ Have homeowner's or renter's insurance in which the adopted animal(s) would be covered.
▪ All members of your household must be in agreement to adopt a new animal.
▪ If you rent, be able to provide a written letter of consent from your landlord that you are allowed to foster a cat or dog (letter must specifically state weight and breed of dog).
▪ Be able and willing to spend the time necessary to provide training and proper care for your foster animal.
▪ Agree to a home-visit prior to approval of fostering from RHAR.

WHAT DOES FOSTERING COST ME?

Fostering through Ruff House Animal Rescue doesn’t cost you anything!  We cover all vetting expenses and can provide all of the necessary items that you may need in order to care for a foster animal; this includes crates, toys, dog food, food and water dishes, leash and collar.

HOW LONG WILL MY FOSTER ANIMAL BE WITH ME?

Fosters stay with you until they are adopted.  This can vary greatly;  an easy to place puppy may only be in your home for a few days while a harder to adopt older pet may be with you for several months.  Our pets that are in foster care are adopted out at a faster rate than those who aren't.  However, if you are only able to foster for a limited amount of time, that is ok; we can help find the appropriate foster for you, and if they haven't been adopted by the time you can no longer foster, we will find another foster family for them.  You can define your commitment.

HOW WILL MY FOSTER DOG FIND THEIR FOREVER HOME?

While dogs are in our rescue, they are promoted on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram; they are also listed on Adopt a Pet and PetFinder, and shared with other pet adoption sites.  We also participate in adoption events to publicize our adoptable dogs.  Foster homes are the most knowledgeable about their foster dogs needs and personality; this includes their quirks, likes and dislikes, tricks they may know… The more pictures and information foster homes  are able to provide us with, the better chance they have of finding a suitable home.  Our goal is to set our adoptable dogs up for success with their new families!

DO I GET TO CHOOSE MY FOSTER DOG?

Our pets are placed based on need, temperament, and your abilities.  You can identify preferences in the application process and we will strive to match you with a foster suitable to your family, lifestyle, and abilities; you can also determine that a recommended pet may not fit into your family.  The more you foster, the better we can appropriately place the right foster with you.  You can also volunteer at our adoption events to get to know of our pets better - you may find yourself bringing one home with you to foster!  The pet that you foster is ultimately your choice.

WHAT IF MY FOSTER ANIMAL ISN’T WORKING OUT?

RHAR will make every effort to ensure a good and safe foster match.  However, there are times when this will fail.  In this case, contact your RHAR representative as soon as possible.  If the issues are minor, RHAR will work with you to address them.  Many times, problems can be solved by trying a few new things and/or by giving the animal time to adjust to your home.  For example, we can switch crates, switch foods, or offer simple behavioral solutions to try.  We may also have a trainer work with you. Other times, an animal may simply not be a good fit for your home or lifestyle. RHAR will always take the foster animal back if an issue cannot be resolved.  However, we ask that you give us at least 72 hours to make a plan; if that is not possible, we will make emergency arrangements.  RHAR never wants to put the safety of the Foster person, their own animals, or the foster animal in jeopardy.

WHAT IF MY PET BECOMES SICK OR ILL FROM MY FOSTER DOG?

We require that all foster homes with existing pets have their resident pets up-to-date on vaccinations (DHPP and Bordetella) and spayed or neutered.  We also recommend that resident animals are on Heartworm Preventative that protects against intestinal parasites.  It is recommended that foster animals be kept separate from resident animals until they have been to the vet and had their vetting brought up-to-date.

WHAT IF MY PET IS INJURED BY MY FOSTER DOG?

We require that any existing pets meet all potential foster animals prior to accepting them into your home in order to determine if there are any immediate issues between animals.  RHAR recommends keeping your foster animal separate from resident pets for a minimum of one-week while they get accustomed to each other’s presence, and introductions should be conducted slowly.  A RHAR representative is available to educate fosters families on proper introductions and decompression and to assist in conducting these.  RHAR cannot be held financially liable for any sickness or injuries that may occur due to a foster animal; however resident animals would be permitted to utilize our negotiated vetting rates if anything were to occur.

DO I HAVE ANY SAY IN WHO ADOPTS MY FOSTER?

Yes; we greatly value the input of the foster family as you know the pet best and can usually determine the right family fit for your foster.  While the RHAR Adoption Coordination has the final say over adoptions, we love for the foster family to be involved in finding the perfect home.  Foster families are welcome to help us review applications, host meet and greets, and perform home-checks for their foster animal.  


WHAT IF I WANT TO KEEP MY FOSTER?


Foster's are welcome to adopt their foster animals!  Foster's who choose to adopt must notify RHAR once the decision to adopt has been made; if a trial adoption with another adopter is already in place, that adopter does get priority however.